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Doctors & Medical Professionals: Here’s How To Respond To Search Warrants

Search Warrants Can Be Scary – Here’s How To Respond

Search Warrant Audit Physician Doctor Attorney Lawyer Jeyaram & Associates“Knock. Knock.”

“Who’s there?”

“The Government. And here is a search warrant.”

Sadly, this is no joke and many doctors and healthcare providers will be served with warrants this year.

Warrants can mean anything from audits to criminal activity and have serious consequences including putting your practice out of business.

Step-By-Step Response To Search Warrants

If the government shows up at your door with a search warrant, the following are some important steps to follow:

  • Immediately call your attorney. It is crucial to call an attorney who has experience in both healthcare law and defense.
  • Ask for identification of the people at your door. Review the credentials or business card. Write down the name and contact information.
  • Do NOT destroy, alter or remove any documents.
  • Be polite. Remain calm. Be cooperative. Say please and thank you.
  • Ask for a copy of the search warrant and any affidavits filed in support of the warrant.
  • Ask what crime and conduct is under investigation.
  • Request that no interviews be conducted until your attorney arrives.
  • Immediately advise all supervisory personnel of the search and that they are to wait for the attorney to arrive before answering any questions.
  • Compile an inventory of all the documents being removed and ask if you can copy all the documents being seized – this includes making a back up disk for all computer files.
  • Make a record of everything said by an investigating officer. If you cannot do this during the search, write up your recollection after the search.
  • If possible, videotape or photograph the search.
  • DO NOT speak with the press.

Contact Experienced Legal Help Immediately

It’s imperative to follow these steps. But if nothing else, immediately contact an attorney and he/she will help guide you through the process.

Jeyaram & Associates has helped hundreds of providers successfully handle government investigations. Contact DJ Jeyaram at DJ@JeyLaw.com or 678.325.3872.

Are You Compliant? HHS Issues Guidance & Likely To Continue HIPAA Compliance Scrutiny

HIPAA AuditThe Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) started the year by publishing new HIPAA guidance with respect to patient access to medical records.

While the recent HHS guidance does not add anything new to the regulations, it serves as a reminder to providers of certain provisions in the law. The guidance is intended as a tool to aid individuals in exercising their rights to access their medical records and to help providers ensure HIPAA compliance.

HHS highlighted certain provisions in the HIPAA regulations including provider obligations to respond to a request from a patient within 30 days and provide PHI in an electronic format if requested (assuming the electronic format requested can be readily produced by the provider).

The guidance also reminds providers that covered entities are not required to provide every single record about an individual even if the individual asks. Certain exceptions to a patient’s right to access include:

  • Patients do not have the right to access to information that is not used to make decisions about that individual. For example, certain quality assessment or improvement records, patient safety activity records, or business planning, development and management records that are used for business decisions do not have to be provided to an individual.
  • Individuals do not have a right to access psychotherapy notes that a mental health professional maintains separately from the individual’s medical record and that document or analyze the contents of a counseling session with the individual.
  • Providers can deny access to certain records if a licensed health care professional determines in the exercise of professional judgment that the access requested is reasonably likely to endanger the life or physical safety of the individual or another person.
  • Patients do not have a right to access certain records compiled in reasonable anticipation of, or for use in, a legal proceeding.

Additionally, providers do not have to create new information, such as explanatory materials or analyses, that does not already exist in the record.

The government’s emphasis on HIPAA is expected to continue with pending audits of covered entities and business associates likely to take place this quarter. Now is the time for healthcare providers to review their policies to ensure that they are complying with the HIPAA regulations.

If you would like to review the HHS guidance it is available at http://www.hhs.gov/hipaa/for-professionals/privacy/guidance/access/index.html.

If you need help ensuring HIPAA compliance, please contact Danielle Hildebrand at dhildebrand@jeylaw.com or 678.325.3872.

 

 

Medical Group Management Association: Governmental/Third Party Payer Forum This Friday

Stop by our booth this Friday, November 9th, at the Medical Group Management Association (MGMA) Governmental/Third Party Payer Forum to learn more about how Jeyaram & Associates can help medical practice managers with issues such as Medicaid and Medicare audits, reimbursement disputes, litigation and appeals and how Jeyaram & Associates can serve as your in-house counsel.

https://m360.gmgma.com/event.aspx?eventID=58989&instance=0