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How Georgia Healthcare-Related Bills Fared This Legislative Session

Georgia Legislative SessionThe Georgia 2015-2016 legislative session has officially closed. Of the various healthcare-related bills that were introduced throughout the session, here are some significant bills and how they fared this session:

  • SB 145: This bill would have expanded the list of conditions that could be treated with medical marijuana from 8 to 15 including post traumatic stress disorder, HIV/AIDS and autism. Although it passed the House, it was never brought to a vote in the Senate.
  • HB 916: This bill limits the Department of Community Health’s ability to recoup Medicaid funds based on clerical errors. Having been passed by both the House and the Senate, this bill currently awaits Governor Deal’s signature. If signed into law, the bill will give providers an opportunity to fix paperwork errors without penalty.
  • HB 919: This bill would have allowed individuals to receive state tax credits for donations to rural healthcare organizations. However, the Senate never voted on the bill.
  • SB 302: This bill, which requires health insurers to maintain accurate directories of their providers, passed both houses.
  • HB 1055: This bill would have repealed and replaced Georgia Certificate of Need (CON) law. However, it did not make it very far during the 2015-2015 legislative session having failed to make it past crossover day.
  • SB 1/HB 429: This bill was introduced in the Senate but its contents were ultimately combined with HB 429 prior to passing both houses. It requires insurance coverage for treatment of autism spectrum disorders.
  • HB 684: Introduced as a result of the efforts by the Georgia Dental Hygienists’ Association this bill would have allowed dental hygienists in certain settings to perform preventative care services without a dentist present. Neither the House nor the Senate brought it to a vote therefore it did not even make it past crossover day.
  • SB 304: This bill originally addressed the disclosure of certain mental health records with respect to gun background checks. The final bill passed by the legislature focuses on more efficient testing of rape kits.

If you have any questions or need assistance with healthcare regulatory issues, Jeyaram & Associates attorneys can help. Contact DJ Jeyaram at or 678.325.3872.

Bill Would Eliminate Several Certificate Of Need (CON) Requirements

Certificate of NeedGeorgia House Bill 1055 Would Eliminate “Certificate of Need” (“CON”) Requirements For Several Types Of Healthcare Facilities

Georgia House Bill 1055 would cause a substantial change in the way the state regulates healthcare providers. Georgia’s CON program is administered by the Department of Community Health (DCH). A CON is required for entities before building, acquiring or expanding healthcare services and facilities. Read the full bill here.

Roots of CON Requirements Almost 40 Years Old

Georgia first created its CON program in 1979 in response to the federal “Health Planning Resources Development Act” of 1974. The federal act was later repealed, but many states including Georgia continue to have CON requirements.

The goal of Georgia’s CON program was to “ensure access to quality health care services and to ensure that health care services and facilities are developed in an orderly and economical manner and are made available to all citizens and that only those health care services found to be in the public interest shall be provided in this state.” § 31-6-1. However, since then, the efficacy of CON programs has been questioned, and bills have been introduced seeking to change Georgia’s CON program one way or another nearly every year.

Larger Healthcare Providers Argue CONs Increase Barriers To Expanding

Larger hospitals oppose measures to weaken CON requirements which restrict potential competitors. Hospitals argue they need to use profits from surgical procedures to subsidize less profitable care they are required to provide to the uninsured. On the other hand, physicians and smaller healthcare facilities tend to advocate weakening or eliminating CON requirements because those requirements create barriers to offering services in certain healthcare areas. If House Bill 1055 passes, it would significantly reduce barriers for building multi-specialty surgery centers. Physicians contend changes like this would help lower healthcare costs.

Get Help With CON Requirements

Unless House Bill 1055 passes, Georgia’s CON program will continue to loom large for health care providers of all sizes. At Jeyaram & Associates, we have extensive experience with the CON process and related Letter of Determination and Letter of Non-Reviewability requirements and can help your practice. Contact DJ Jeyaram at  or Jonathan Anderson at