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Office of Inspector General’s Advisory Could Affect Payment to All Healthcare Providers

OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES SEALOn May 8, 2013, the Office of Inspector General (“OIG”) issued an Advisory Bulletin pertaining to exclusion and excluded healthcare providers.  Because exclusion could potentially affect every provider, it is important to learn more details about the designation.

If the OIG excludes a provider, then no Federal health care program payments may be made for items or services furnished by the excluded provider or prescribed or directed by the excluded provider.  If the excluded provider changes from one health care profession to another, the exclusion will still be in effect.

In addition, the prohibition is not limited to direct patient care; it also includes services such as review of treatment plans, preparation of surgical trays, or services provided related to filling prescriptions.  Transportation services provided by excluded individuals are also prohibited.

Finally, according to the Bulletin, excluded individuals are prohibited from providing any administrative or management services, even if they are not separately billable.

There are severe consequences if an excluded individual submits a claim or causes a claim to be submitted to a Federal health care program.  A civil monetary penalty of $10,000 per claimed item or service may be imposed.  In addition, any potential for reinstatement to Federal health care programs may be jeopardized.  Criminal penalties may also be imposed.

Civil monetary penalties may be imposed against providers that employ or enter into contracts with excluded individuals to provide items or services payable by a Federal health care program.  Further, there may be civil monetary penalties for health maintenance organizations that contract with or employ excluded individuals.  This does not mean that entities cannot hire or contract with excluded individuals at all.

If the services or items provided are not paid for by a Federal health care program, then there isn’t a prohibition against hiring or contracting with an excluded individual.  If the excluded individual only provides services or items to patients that are not covered by a Federal health care program, then there is no prohibition.

All individuals and entities should search the OIG program exclusion information that is available on the OIG Web site prior to employing or contracting with any provider of health care services and keep documentation of the search. 

In addition, individuals and entities should proactively monitor the exclusions database to ensure that none of its current employees or contractors is listed as an excluded provider.  Due diligence will help mitigate the risk of civil monetary penalties in the future.

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