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What To Do When Your Special Needs Child Completes High School

ClassroomPictPart I: The Path To Employment

As our children begin to enter into early adolescence, many of us begin to realize that many – if not all – of the services and programs that our child relies on for care will soon disappear and be replaced by radically different benefits.

Most of these new benefits abruptly come into play once our children leave the public education system. This may happen at any time between the ages of 18 and 23, depending on the state you live in and your child’s particular needs.

One of the most important aspects of this transition is securing employment services for our children. According to the National Collaborative on Workforce and Disability, one-quarter of all adults with disabilities work at either a full- or part-time job.

Some of the remaining three-quarters are unable to work at all due to their disability; but a large number of disabled adults who aren’t employed don’t have a job because they lack the skills necessary for gainful employment. Several federal laws address this situation with the goal of providing vocational education to a wider segment of the population with disabilities.

The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) mandates that special education plans begin transition planning when a child turns 14. At this point, a written transition plan must be incorporated into a child’s Individual Education Plan (IEP), outlining the steps a school will take to help a child with special needs acquire skills necessary for an eventual move into the workforce.

By the time the child turns 16, the special education team must steer the child towards development programs keyed towards the child’s individual vocational preferences. The law also mandates periodic measurement of the child’s progress to ensure that he receives attention from the proper vocational advocates.

Once your child reaches 18 and receives either Supplemental Security Income (SSI) or Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) payments, the Social Security Administration (SSA) offers several programs to encourage your child to work. The best-known program, Ticket to Work, is a somewhat complicated program designed to offer beneficiaries a way to begin a career without having to worry about losing their SSI or SSDI benefits.

SSI beneficiaries, on the other hand, must conform to very strict income and asset limits. Often, beneficiaries who could hold a job do not pursue one because they are worried that they will lose their SSI benefits once they earn too much. While this is certainly a concern, the benefits of employment may outweigh the loss of SSI. Furthermore, the government provides specific incentives for SSI beneficiaries to work. For instance, if a person with disabilities is under 22 and at school or in a vocational training program, $1,780 of his monthly income does not count against his SSI benefit, up to a yearly limit of $7,180.

The Social Security Administration also offers the PASS (Plan for Achieving Self Support) program for SSI beneficiaries who would like to work. Under this program, a beneficiary presents the SSA with a detailed plan for obtaining a specific type of employment. Once the SSA approves the plan, a beneficiary sets aside income and assets towards achieving her goal without having those funds count against her benefit. Funds can be used for things like childcare, transportation, books and supplies, and additional education and training.

Many programs are available for people with special needs to seek employment if they would like to do so. Unfortunately, the rules for most of these programs are complicated and the SSA is often not very good at explaining them.

Beginning to plan well before your child completes high school – with the assistance of local vocational agencies and qualified special needs planners – is your best chance for successfully navigating the maze of educational opportunities for your child.



Special Needs Trusts & Estate Plans – When’s The Right Time?


As a parent or guardian of a child or adult with special needs, one of our main concerns is what will happen to our loved ones when we pass? Who will take care of them? Will they have enough money? Will they be OK?

And while most of us try NOT think about dying, it’s an important step in ensuring that our loved ones will be protected and cared for upon our passing. Putting into place a special needs trust is something we can do to help ensure that our child or adult ward will be well cared for and have a high quality of life.

Too many times we’ve seen families devastated by the sudden loss of parents or guardians. Now is the time to plan and put into place a legal plan that will help protect your loved ones and their government benefits.

Eligibility for many government benefits are determined based on the resources your child or adult ward holds in their name. If they have too many resources, even by just one dollar, they may not qualify for, or may even lose, benefits such as Supplemental Security Income (SSI) and Medicaid.

Even if your child or ward does not currently receive government assistance, he or she may need it in the future. A special needs trust is a way to protect their current resources and future benefits. Through a special needs trust you can leave assets to your child or ward without negatively impacting his or her government benefits.

Government benefits only cover basics such as food, clothing and shelter. Through a special needs trust, a designated trustee for your loved one will be able to provide your child or adult ward with access to things such as:

  • a personal care attendant
  • out of pocket medical and dental expenses
  • vacations
  • home furnishings
  • vehicles
  • hobbies
  • and education.

Jeyaram & Associates has extensive personal and legal experience with setting up special needs trusts and estate plans. Please contact DJ Jeyaram at or 678.325.3872

Most Important Item On Your “To-Do” List That Never Gets Done: Create A Will

Wills, Trusts and Estate PlanningEveryone, yes, everyone, needs a will, trust or estate plan. Most of us know we need a will. Most of think about it. And then we put it on our “To-Do List” and forget about it until we hear about someone who recently lost a loved one. And then we think about it again, and put it back on our “To-Do List” – only to forget about it again.

However, completing a will, trust or estate plan is one of the easiest things you can do to protect your loved ones and your assets.

Jeyaram & Associates can help you protect what’s most important to you with a will, trust or estate plan. We’ll walk you through the process, step-by-step – without all the legal jargon. No one likes to think about dying, but having a legal plan in place can make your passing much easier on your loved ones.

Contact DJ Jeyaram: or 678.325.3872

A New Year’s Resolution You Can Keep – Create A Will, Trust or Estate Plan

According to a University of Scranton psychology study, only 8 percent of Americans who make New Year’s resolutions will will keep them. Top New Year’s resolutions include losing weight, getting organized, falling in love, and enjoying life to the fullest.

What’s missing from the top ten list is a resolution to keep loved ones safe and plan for the future. This resolution can easily be achieved by putting into place a will, trust or estate plan. And while most of us try NOT to think about dying, establishing a will, trust or estate is an important step in ensuring that our loved ones will be protected and cared for upon our passing. Too often we’ve seen families devastated by the lack of planning for the future.

Jeyaram & Associates offers wills, trusts and estate planning and can help you protect what you love most. Contact or 678.325.3872