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& Medical Provider Attorneys

Are You Compliant? HHS Issues Guidance & Likely To Continue HIPAA Compliance Scrutiny

HIPAA AuditThe Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) started the year by publishing new HIPAA guidance with respect to patient access to medical records.

While the recent HHS guidance does not add anything new to the regulations, it serves as a reminder to providers of certain provisions in the law. The guidance is intended as a tool to aid individuals in exercising their rights to access their medical records and to help providers ensure HIPAA compliance.

HHS highlighted certain provisions in the HIPAA regulations including provider obligations to respond to a request from a patient within 30 days and provide PHI in an electronic format if requested (assuming the electronic format requested can be readily produced by the provider).

The guidance also reminds providers that covered entities are not required to provide every single record about an individual even if the individual asks. Certain exceptions to a patient’s right to access include:

  • Patients do not have the right to access to information that is not used to make decisions about that individual. For example, certain quality assessment or improvement records, patient safety activity records, or business planning, development and management records that are used for business decisions do not have to be provided to an individual.
  • Individuals do not have a right to access psychotherapy notes that a mental health professional maintains separately from the individual’s medical record and that document or analyze the contents of a counseling session with the individual.
  • Providers can deny access to certain records if a licensed health care professional determines in the exercise of professional judgment that the access requested is reasonably likely to endanger the life or physical safety of the individual or another person.
  • Patients do not have a right to access certain records compiled in reasonable anticipation of, or for use in, a legal proceeding.

Additionally, providers do not have to create new information, such as explanatory materials or analyses, that does not already exist in the record.

The government’s emphasis on HIPAA is expected to continue with pending audits of covered entities and business associates likely to take place this quarter. Now is the time for healthcare providers to review their policies to ensure that they are complying with the HIPAA regulations.

If you would like to review the HHS guidance it is available at

If you need help ensuring HIPAA compliance, please contact Danielle Hildebrand at or 678.325.3872.



Jonathan Anderson Joins Jeyaram & Associates

Jonathan AndersonPlease help us welcome Jonathan Anderson to our legal team!

Mr. Anderson is an associate attorney specializing in healthcare law. Prior to joining Jeyaram & Associates, Mr. Anderson worked as a legal intern on the Disability Integration Project for the Atlanta Legal Aid Society.

Mr. Anderson provided legal support to individuals with disabilities to help them remain in or move back the community rather than live in institutions. He also worked extensively with state Medicaid waivers including appealing the State’s decisions to terminate benefits of disabled individuals.

Mr. Anderson also served as an intern for the Health Law Partnership (HeLP) which serves clients whom meet certain income requirements and have a treatment relationship with Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta (CHOA). He conducted interviews, drafted briefs for Supplemental Security Insurance, and researched how changes in Supplemental Security Insurance regulations affected HeLP clients.

Legal Expertise

  • Medicaid Waivers
  • Medicare
  • Mediation

Jonathan can be reached at

Jeyaram & Associate Medicaid Fraud Expert Interviewed On “Mostly Medicaid”

Medicaid FraudJeyaram & Associate attorney Kimberly Sheridan was interviewed about Medicaid fraud.

The segment originally aired today on the national site “Mostly Medicaid.”

To hear the interview, click here.


Physicians Need To Be Prepared For Increased Medicare & Medicaid Fraud Scrutiny

doctor-in-handcuffs-caption-1HHS increases resources to root out and penalize fraud:  Review existing financial arrangements NOW

On June 30th the federal Department of Health and Human Services Office of the Inspector General announced that it has created a specialized unit comprised of attorneys focused on Medicare and Medicaid fraud. This announcement comes on the heels of the OIG Special Fraud Alert reminding physicians of anti-kickback liability for illegal compensation related to arrangements with healthcare institutions.

Physicians should be prepared for increased scrutiny and an uptick in enforcement actions for kickback violations. According to OIG official Lisa Re, the new unit will be targeting kickback cases and will be going after not only the individual or organization paying the kickbacks but also the recipient of the kickbacks, e.g., the physicians.

Physicians who have financial arrangements that violate the Federal Anti-Kickback Statute would not only be subject to fines in the form of Civil Money Penalties, but could also be excluded from the Medicare and Medicaid programs.

Now is the time for physicians to review existing or proposed financial arrangements to ensure that they do not pose any risk of violating the Anti-Kickback Statute.

If you have any questions about a particular arrangement our attorneys can help. Please call Danielle Hildebrand or DJ Jeyaram at 678-325-3872 for legal counsel.

Increase In Medicare Part D Fraud Investigations

medicare-fraud1On June 18th, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services announced a nationwide sweep by the Medicare Fraud Strike Force in 17 districts. This sweep represents the largest criminal healthcare fraud takedown in the history of the Department of Justice.

The investigations led to charges against 243 individuals, including 46 doctors and 197 other medical personnel. These individual are charged with participating in Medicare fraud schemes, including prescription drug fraud, totaling approximately $712 million in false billings.

On the heels of this announcement, the Office of Inspector General issued two new reports citing its findings of numerous nationwide violations of Medicare part D, Medicare’s drug benefit program. The reports show that more than 1,400 pharmacies submitted questionable billings for opioid drugs and also point to questionable billing practices in 1,432 retail pharmacies. The OIG is calling for more action from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services to implement a greater number of its recommendations for fighting fraud and abuse in Part D.

The timing of these reports signals that the prescription drug benefit in Medicare part D will continue to be on the radar for investigation and enforcement actions.

To best protect against facing investigation for violations of federal and state healthcare regulations, providers must create, consistently practice and enforce strong internal compliance programs. If you need assistance with developing a compliance program or have any questions about healthcare fraud, please call or email Kimberly Sheridan at 678-708-4702.


OIG Reports


Former DCH Attorney Joins Jeyaram & Associates

Screen shot 2015-06-26 at 2.55.32 PMMr. Harrison Kohler joins Jeyaram & Associates as counsel. Mr. Kohler brings extensive criminal defense and administrative hearing experience to the firm. He represented the Department of Community Health (DCH) for nine years in both administrative hearings and negotiations with attorneys for Medicaid providers.

Prior to joining DCH, Mr. Kohler served as an Assistant Attorney General, which included 10 years as a prosecutor in the Medicaid Fraud Control Unit. During that time, he had 90 jury trials, including both criminal and civil, in 15 different superior courts and two federal districts in Georgia.

Further, Mr. Kohler has orally argued approximately 50 appellate cases. He successfully argued Georgia v. McCollum, 505 U.S. 42 (1992), in the United States Supreme Court. In 1996 the Supreme Court Historical Society named Georgia v. McCollum as one of the most significant oral arguments heard by the United States Supreme Court between the years 1955 and 1993.

Prior to pursuing a legal career, Mr. Kohler  served three years in the United States Army, including a year in Vietnam. He was awarded the combat medical badge and the Army Commendation Medal with Oak Leaf Cluster. Mr. Kohler has also been recognized by his peers as he’s earned the AV Peer Review Rating, which identifies a lawyer with “very high to preeminent legal ability, is a reflection of the firm’s expertise, experience, integrity and overall professional excellence.”

Please help us welcome Harrison to the firm!

Medicaid Fraud Investigations Continue But With Few Indictments

Medicaid FraudMedicaid Fraud Control Units (MFCUs) are responsible for investigating and prosecuting Medicaid provider fraud and patient abuse and neglect.  As part of its Medicaid plan, each State must establish a MFCU.  These Units are funded by both the Federal and State government with the Federal government reimbursing about 75% of the operating costs. MFCUs receive their referrals for investigation from a wide array of sources: program integrity divisions of the State Medicaid agencies; anonymous tips; whistleblowers; audits; and adult protective service agencies.

Each spring, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Inspector General, publishes an Annual Report summarizing the statistical data from the investigations and prosecutions conducted and reported by the 50 MFCUs nationwide. According to this Annual Report, in 2014, MFCUs reported 1,318 criminal convictions involving Medicaid providers; three-quarters of these convictions were for fraud. Recoveries in the criminal cases were close to $300 million, and 1,337 providers were excluded from Federal health care programs as a result of criminal conviction.

Out of the more than 1,000 criminal convictions:

  • 413 were Home Health Care Aides
  • 129 were Certified Nursing Aides
  • 64 were Physicians or Doctors of Osteopathy
  • 56 were Counselors/Psychologists
  • 33 were Durable Medical Equipment Suppliers

Nationwide, MFCUs investigated 13,192 cases of Medicaid Fraud but only indicted 1, 185 cases- roughly, 10%.  Of the 1,185 indictments, 956 resulted in convictions, almost 100% conviction rate.   From this data, it appears as if the trend in investigating often but indicting infrequently continued from 2013 to 2014 and that the high conviction rate also continued.

What about in Georgia?  Georgia MFCU was even less reluctant to indict than the nationwide trend but enjoyed the same success rate with convictions:  410 fraud investigations; 4 indictments for fraud and only 9 convictions.

If you are a Medicaid Provider, you very well may find yourself being investigated for fraud, but stay calm and call an experienced healthcare attorney. Remember, you have a very, very small chance of actually being indicted.

If you do  receive a subpoena or phone call from the Georgia Medicaid Fraud Unit, Jeyaram & Associates can help. Contact Kimberly Sheridan at or 678.325.3872.


What To Do If You Receive A Medicaid Fraud Subpoena In Georgia

medicaid fraudThe Georgia Medicaid Fraud Control Unit (MFCU) investigates and prosecutes fraud and abuse by providers in the Georgia Medicaid program.  One of the first steps MFCU takes when it opens up a case against a provider is often the issuance of an investigative subpoena, requesting specific patient records.

Often the provider has already been looked at by the Georgia Department of Community Health’s Medicaid Program Integrity Unit which handles intake and triage of cases before turning them over to MFCU. In other words, the provider has somehow managed to get on the State’s radar, and it is serious.

Please keep the following in mind if you receive a Medicaid Fraud subpoena:

1. CALL AN EXPERIENCED HEALTHCARE FRAUD ATTORNEY. This is a highly specialized area of the law, and you need someone to represent you that has experience both in defending criminal matters AND in healthcare law. This area of law is like a hybrid car. Just like it takes gas and electric batteries to power a hybrid car, it takes knowledge of criminal and healthcare law to successfully represent a provider facing a Medicaid fraud investigation.

2. Call an attorney BEFORE you respond to the subpoena or talk to an investigator.

3. Remember: the Investigator is NOT your friend. They are doing a job, and their job is find evidence against you. We recently represented a client who was complying with a subpoena from MFCU. Five investigators showed up to get the documents. Since there was no threat of an armed suspect, one can only guess that the use of five investigators to collect documents had to be an intimidation tactic. Likewise, these investigators tried desperately to butter up the employees to get them to talk, and this was with an attorney standing there. Remember: the investigator is NOT your friend.

4. Be Polite and cooperative. If your attorney determines that the subpoena is lawful and enforceable, you have to turn over the documents requested. This can be quite labor- intensive, but you must comply and polite cooperation can only help you in establishing the tone for whatever next steps will be taken.

5. Make copies of every document and electronic file you turnover to MFCU PRIOR to turning them over.

6. DO NOT provide MFCU with anything more than what they have requested in the subpoena- not one document more. And remember, they are only entitled to the records of Medicaid members.

7. Neither you nor your employees are required to speak with the investigator unless individually subpoenaed. Have an attorney present during any interviews.

8. Don’t panic. While a MFCU subpoena should be taken seriously, in Georgia, in 2014, there were 410 Medicaid Fraud Investigations. Of those investigations, only 4 led to indictment.1 The math indicates that MFCU investigates often but indicts with much less frequency.

If you are receive a subpoena from the Georgia Medicaid Fraud Unit, Jeyaram & Associates can help. Contact Kimberly Sheridan at or 678.325.3872.