Georgia's Trusted Healthcare
& Medical Provider Attorneys

GA’s City & Urban Hospitals Will Be Impacted By The American Health Care Act

Emergency Sign Healthcare LawPassage of the American Health Care Act in its current or proposed form with significant cuts to Medicaid and Medicare will not only impact rural hospitals and facilities, but city and urban hospitals as well. Here’s how.

Steep cuts to Medicaid and Medicare will result in many of Georgia’s 95 health clinics being unable to keep their doors open. These facilities serve a population that is often primarily at the poverty level, the elderly, unemployed and uninsured.

As a result, city and urban facilities could see a significant increase in uninsured and under insured patients as these patients do not have access to any other options for healthcare.

City & Urban Hospitals Need To Prepare for New Challenges

Hospitals will need to:

• Increase medical and administrative staffing to handle the influx of additional patients, especially for patients that may utilize ER services in place of what would have been primary care services prior to the cuts.

• Absorb the costs of an increase in patients and staffing as there will be little or no government money (or at best temporary money) to assist (Medicaid or Medicare).

• Review internal policies on how to handle additional patients and billing procedures for patients who cannot afford medical care.

It’s imperative for all hospitals to begin reviewing policies and procedures before an influx of patients occurs and the potential for lawsuits arises.

Experienced Healthcare Attorneys

Jeyaram & Associates has more than 50 years legal healthcare experience and has helped numerous city and urban hospitals conduct internal audits, write policies and procedures and ensure compliance with state and federal laws.

Contact Us

Free initial consults. Contact DJ at or 678.325.3872.

Former Jeyaram & Associates’ Interns Shine

Best Atlanta Attorney Lawyers Jeyaram Associates Healthcare Special Needs Trusts Guardianship Will Estate PlanningArnall Golden & Gregory, a large Atlanta firm, recently held a mock trial for its associates to practice and hone their skills (a practice by many large law firms and law schools), and the team that won the largest verdict was named “Team Jeyaram!”

After a long day of trial on a recent Saturday, the team consisting of two former Jeyaram & Associates interns Michael Bargar & Madison Pool won the largest verdict – 5x any other award for the day!

My former interns and current friends wrote, “We thought that you would get a kick out of our success given our former roles with your firm!”

We know it was the skills of Michael and Madison that won the day, but maybe, just maybe, their team name helped just a little!

Thanks for sharing this fun story Michael and Madison! We are very proud of you both!


Do Your Loved Ones Know What You Want If You Become Incapacitated? Do You?

will trusts estate planning incapacitatedSpecial blog post by Cassandra Jeyaram, PhD

The week before Thanksgiving, my 90-year-old grandfather passed away at his home. I am so thankful I was able to spend his last few days, hours and minutes with him.

Although he was incapacitated and could not talk, open his eyes or move his body, he knew I was there. I talked to him about his hometown of Winooski, Vermont, played his favorite CDs and told him some bad jokes, at which he managed a half smile on several occasions.

I shared with him how he taught me how to ice skate, fish (and subsequently get a fishing hook out of my belly button) and how to eat watermelon. I rubbed his feet, held his hands, and tried to make sure he was as comfortable as possible.

This Is An Important Conversation To Have With Loved Ones

It was during these last few precious moments with my grandfather that I realized I had never thought about what I would want during my final moments if I were incapacitated. Being incapacitated is something my family never discussed. Although it’s a conversation no ones like to have, it’s an important one.

Upon returning home after my grandfather’s passing, my husband and I sat down to update our wills and document in detail what we both wanted if we were incapacitated.

I would love a view of nature, classical music gently playing in the background and soft blankets. We also wrote down that if someone became upset while visiting me, they would be asked to leave the room. I know my heart would break hearing/seeing/feeling someone I love upset. I included this as I watched my grandmother sobbing over my grandfather with her tears falling on his face.

I can only imagine the heartbreak both of them were feeling after being married 69 years. I could sense my grandfather was holding on for my grandmother and only when my grandmother peacefully fell asleep on the couch next to him did he finally let go.

Some Things To Think About

When we think about “Estate Plans,” we often only think about our wills and what happens if we die. But an important part of our estate plans are our wishes of what we would want to hear, see or feel if we are incapacitated. Some things to consider are, where do you want to be? At home? In a hospital? What sounds or sights would you like? Do you have a favorite CD? Movie? Do you want your pet to be with you? Who would you like to visit you?

While these questions are not exhaustive, they are designed to help you to start thinking about your wishes if you become incapacitated and are unable to communicate. There are no right or wrong answers. It’s what you want.

As I look back on my grandfather’s life and this post, I realize my grandfather taught me many things, including that I need to communicate and document my final wishes.

Documenting Your Final Wishes

If you’d like help with your final wishes, DJ can help guide you through the process and make sure they are a part of your will or estate plan. He can be reached at 678.325.3872 or


Doctors & Medical Professionals: Here’s How To Respond To Search Warrants

Search Warrants Can Be Scary – Here’s How To Respond

Search Warrant Audit Physician Doctor Attorney Lawyer Jeyaram & Associates“Knock. Knock.”

“Who’s there?”

“The Government. And here is a search warrant.”

Sadly, this is no joke and many doctors and healthcare providers will be served with warrants this year.

Warrants can mean anything from audits to criminal activity and have serious consequences including putting your practice out of business.

Step-By-Step Response To Search Warrants

If the government shows up at your door with a search warrant, the following are some important steps to follow:

  • Immediately call your attorney. It is crucial to call an attorney who has experience in both healthcare law and defense.
  • Ask for identification of the people at your door. Review the credentials or business card. Write down the name and contact information.
  • Do NOT destroy, alter or remove any documents.
  • Be polite. Remain calm. Be cooperative. Say please and thank you.
  • Ask for a copy of the search warrant and any affidavits filed in support of the warrant.
  • Ask what crime and conduct is under investigation.
  • Request that no interviews be conducted until your attorney arrives.
  • Immediately advise all supervisory personnel of the search and that they are to wait for the attorney to arrive before answering any questions.
  • Compile an inventory of all the documents being removed and ask if you can copy all the documents being seized – this includes making a back up disk for all computer files.
  • Make a record of everything said by an investigating officer. If you cannot do this during the search, write up your recollection after the search.
  • If possible, videotape or photograph the search.
  • DO NOT speak with the press.

Contact Experienced Legal Help Immediately

It’s imperative to follow these steps. But if nothing else, immediately contact an attorney and he/she will help guide you through the process.

Jeyaram & Associates has helped hundreds of providers successfully handle government investigations. Contact DJ Jeyaram at or 678.325.3872.

Why You Want To Avoid Probate

Wills Trusts Estate Planning Attorney Avoid ProbateProbate

It’s a word we often hear when we’re talking about wills or special needs trusts – but what does it mean? And why does everyone tell you to avoid it at all possible costs?

Probate is the formal legal process that occurs after someone passes. Probate involves proving in court that a deceased person’s will is valid and it’s the process of distributing the deceased person’s property. If the deceased had a will, the legal process is usually straight forward with little room for dispute and can be handled by your family attorney.

However, when someone passes and they did not leave a will or trust in place, that’s when things can get complicated and costly, and to be honest, sometimes the probate process can get really ugly. Without a will, the court will appoint an administrator for your estate – this could be anyone – to gather and distribute someone’s assets according to law. Sound simple? Not so much, and here’s why.

It May Seem Unfair

The process of divvying up someone’s assets can be a lengthy and complex process. And ultimately, without a will in place, the end result dictated by law could seem unfair to the deceased’s family. Most people’s assumption on how everything will be divided under the law is usually wrong.

Many of my married clients that have children assume that when they pass, 100% their estate will go to their spouse and when that spouse passes everything will go to their kids. In Georgia, this is incorrect.

In Georgia, the estate is divided evenly between the spouse and the kids (with the spouses the share is no less than 1/3). If your kids are 18 years or older then they get their share outright and not in a trust! Every state has its own criteria of how assets should be distributed if someone passes without a will.

As a result, family members may feel short changed or even worse, they could end up empty handed. This is one of the reasons having a will in place is so important. Wills clearly spell out who should get what, when and how.

It Takes A LONG Time

Further, most probate cases take anywhere from 6 months to a few years. If there are questions or disputes about the estate – it can take even longer. As a result, the family or individuals who stand to inherit the assets will have to wait a long time until the issues are resolved.

This can be a challenge for spouses or loved ones who need that money to pay bills. This could leave them in a financial pinch. With a will, assets – including money in bank accounts – can be distributed relatively quickly.

It Can Be Expensive

Not only is it a lengthy process, but it can be a costly process for those left behind. Though costs will vary from state to state, according to the American Bar Association, probate and administrative fees are estimated to be 6% and 10% of a person’s estate.

That can be a bit of money – and that assessment is made on the gross estate – before any fees are taken out. So the final inheritance will be less than what the deceased had intended. So while we may feel like creating a will is expensive, not having one in place when we pass can be even more costly.

Personal Life Becomes Public Record

And it’s just not the financial cost. There are personal costs too. Without a will in place, the deceased’s assets and their life are reviewed by the courts. As a result, everything becomes a matter of public record. So anyone – yes anyone – including your nosy neighbor, can go to the courthouse and find out what and how much the deceased left behind. This includes any outstanding debts or liens.

During this time, long lost relatives or secret relations may be exposed. This could be embarrassing and devastating for some families. Further, there are investment advisors or real estate investors or other less-than-ethical individuals who will want to “help” the family when in reality they’re just after the deceased’s assets. Having a will or trust in place allows families to keep family matters private and out of unintended “eyes.”

Easier To Put A Plan Into Place Now

Finding the time to put a will or trust into place is often a low priority. However, it should be a top priority as the probate process can be long, cumbersome and expensive. By putting a plan into place today, you’re saving your loved ones a lot of time, expense and heartache.

We’ve helped hundreds of families put into place wills or trusts that best meet their needs and protect their loved ones. It’s a straight-forward questionnaire and we’ll guide you through the entire process. I can be reached at or 678.325.3872.


How To Obtain Guardianship For Your Special Needs Child

Guardianship Attorney GeorgiaIn many states, including Georgia, as soon as your special needs child turns 18, he or she becomes a legal adult and is assumed to be able to make decisions on their own behalf unless a court determines otherwise.

However, if you determine that retaining guardianship over your child once he or she turns 18 is in your child’s best interest, here’s how you do it. (See related post: Is Guardianship The Right Choice When Your Special Needs Child Turns 18?)

Start Planning BEFORE Your Child Turns 18

Requesting guardianship can be a lengthy and involved legal process. In order to retain guardianship of your child, you need to have the court appoint you as your child’s guardian.

To make sure there is not a gap in your child’s guardianship when he or she turns 18, it’s important to prepare your petition to the court well in advance of your child’s 18th birthday. If there is a gap in guardianship (i.e. your child turns 18 before you have guardianship) and a decision needs to be made about your child’s health or legal rights, it could cause some serious problems.

Step-By-Step Process

  • Every state’s guardianship laws differ slightly and the process can be daunting. This is where hiring an attorney to help guide you through the process is beneficial.
  • There are several forms you will need to complete, including forms that will need to be completed by a qualified physician to evaluate your child.
  • Once you submit the forms, your child will need to appear in court with you. As much as possible, you will want to help your child understand the process and what to expect in advance of actually appearing in court.
  • The court will appoint a representative for your child to help determine the merits of your claim that your child is not competent to act on his or her own behalf and that guardianship is in fact the right choice. The representative will most likely want to meet and visit with your child. In addition, in some circumstances, the representative may visit your child at home.
  • Finally, you will need to attend a hearing with your child. At this point, the judge will review and determine if your child is incapacitated and, if so, to what extent he or she requires assistance. Further, the judge will then decide if the person petitioning for guardianship will be appointed as guardian.

Some Things To Consider 

  • You and your spouse or significant other can petition the court to share guardianship. You will become co-guardians.
  • If your child’s need are complex, you can request that a non-profit agency or public or private corporation serve as your child’s guardian.
  • Guardianship may not be the right solution for your child. There are alternatives such as conservator or limited guardianship that give your child more independence.

Once You Are Awarded Guardianship

The paperwork doesn’t stop once you’re awarded guardianship. Every year you will need to file detailed reports about your child’s finances and overall well being. In some states, guardians must also provide proof that they’ve made adequate residential arrangements as well as provided appropriate healthcare services.

If the guardian cannot prove that they have adequately provided for their adult ward, then the court can remove the adult ward and name a different guardian.

Getting Started

As a parent of a special needs child and an attorney with extensive experience with legal issues relating to special needs children, I can help you navigate the complex guardianship process. or 678.325.3872.

DOJ Intends to Increase Healthcare Fraud Penalties By Almost 100%

healthcare fraudThe Department of Justice (“DOJ”) recently announced that it intends to increase healthcare fraud penalties under the False Claims Act (“FCA”) on claims assessed after August 1, 2016.

DOJ’s Justification For The Increase

FCA penalties can already be high since penalties are assessed per-claim. Each false claim presented to the government can be a separate violation. The DOJ’s Interim Final Rule would increase the minimum per-claim penalty from $5,500 to $10,781 and maximum per-claim penalty from $11,000 to $21,563.

This is a steep increase over 96%. While there was a 10% cap on the amount the penalties could increase, that law was amended by the Federal Civil Penalties Inflation Adjustment Act Improvements Act of 2015 (“2015 Act”). The 2015 Act also included a one-time “catch up provision” requiring the first increase be based changes in the consumer price index since the year the penalties were established.

What The Increase Means To Healthcare Providers

This increase could incentivize whistle-blowers to identify false claims because the whistle-blower may be able to keep a percentage of the money recovered. Healthcare providers billing the government need to ensure that all their practice’s policies and procedures adhere with federal and state regulations. Proactive and preventive measures are the best way to stay out of the government’s cross hairs for fraud.

How To Ensure Federal and State Compliance

We can help. Our attorneys have extensive experience in analyzing and bringing into compliance healthcare providers’ policies and procedures. We’ve helped hundred of providers – from small, independent providers to large national corporations ensure compliance with regulations such as the Anti-Kickback Statute and Stark. Contact DJ Jeyaram at or 678.325.3872 or Jonathan Anderson at

Happy Fourth of July!

Special Needs Trusts : Jeyaram & Associates

Charlotte’s taking a nap so she won’t miss the fireworks!

Everyone at Jeyaram & Associates – including DJ’s son’s service dog and our firm mascot Charlotte – wishes you and your family a safe and Happy Fourth of July!

DJ Jeyaram Joins Frazer Center Board of Directors

DJ JeyaramCongratulations DJ Jeyaram for being selected to serve on the Frazer Center Board of Directors.

Mr. Jeyaram joins an esteemed group of community members who are committed to the inclusion of individuals with disabilities. The Frazer Center provides services for children and adults with disabilities.

Honor To Serve

“It’s an honor to serve along with so many esteemed individuals who have committed their lives to helping individuals of all levels of abilities and disabilities,” Mr. Jeyaram said. “The Frazer Center understands and appreciates the value of all individuals and that there is tremendous community benefit and value in diversity.”

The Frazer’s Center Guiding Principles 

  • We value every individual as a member of the community.
  • We strive for excellence in every aspect of our work.
  • We are committed to advocacy and research on behalf of the community we serve.
  • We are faithful stewards of all the resources entrusted to our care: human, natural, and economic.
  • We are committed to building and deepening partnerships knowing we cannot do this alone.

Local and Global Community Inclusion 

The Frazer Center is a long standing advocate and resource for helping with the inclusion of individuals of all abilities into the community. According to an annual report by the Frazer Center, “We are vision builders with a passion for the world that we hope for—one in which each person has the chance to be acknowledged for their gifts, to be valued and included despite any difference in ability, and to be productive members of society.”

Learn More

To learn more about the Frazer Center and the programs it offers for adults and children with disabilities, visit