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& Medical Provider Attorneys

Healthcare Providers Need To Ensure Compliance Under Expansion of False Claims Act

False Claims Act Attorney The U.S. Supreme Court voted unanimously to allow False Claims Act (FCA) liability under the “implied certification theory.”

The implied certification theory means that submitting a claim to the government implies that the entity has complied with all contractual and regulatory requirements.

What The Supreme Court Ruling Means To Healthcare Providers

This decision could have profound repercussions for healthcare providers who bill federal healthcare programs. Healthcare providers must contend with the Stark Law and Anti-Kickback Statute (“AKS”). Violations of either the Stark law or AKS give rise to FCA liability. Healthcare cases make up approximately two-thirds of federal whistle-blower cases, which are enforced using the FCA.

The Supreme Court did not limit liability under the implied certification theory to conditions of payment. This ruling can potentially mean that a facially valid invoice can violate the false claims act case because of requirements that are not explicitly requirements for payment. If a regulation is a condition of participation but not a condition of payment, a violation can still give rise to FCA liability.

The Supreme Court did rule that liability is limited to “material” violations. Materiality may be shown if it is a provision for which the government routinely denies payment. The Court emphasized that the materiality test is “rigorous” and demanding….”

Healthcare Providers Need To Ensure Compliance 

Healthcare providers, and all contractors billing the government, should ensure they are compliant with all statutory, regulatory and contractual requirements.

Jeyaram & Associates’ attorneys have extensive experience in helping healthcare providers remain compliant with all state and federal regulations. Contact DJ Jeyaram at DJ@JeyLaw.com or Jonathan Anderson at Janderson@JeyLaw.com.

Work In Healthcare? You Could Face Steep Fines Or Jail Time For Healthcare Fraud

Healthcare FraudNewly Released Health Care Fraud Report shows that HHS/DOJ Enforcement Efforts Remain Strong

The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and the Department of Justice (DOJ) recently released their annual joint report outlining the results of their healthcare fraud enforcement efforts throughout FY 2015.

The Report shows that during that period the DOJ opened 983 new criminal health care fraud investigations and over 800 new civil health care fraud investigations. Additionally, HHS investigations resulted in 800 criminal actions against individuals or entities that engaged in crimes related to Medicare and Medicaid, and 667 civil actions, CMP settlements, and administrative recoveries related to provider self-disclosure matters.

Over the course of the year, the government won or negotiated over $1.9 billion in health care fraud judgment and settlements.

High Number Of Fraud Convictions

The Report also highlights the activity of the Medicare Fraud Strike Force whose efforts resulted in over 300 guilty pleas and 48 defendant convictions throughout the year, and over 260 defendants going to jail. The Report summarizes several successful enforcement actions by the Strike Force including:

  • 2 physicians owners of a mental health clinic were each sentenced to 10+ years in prison for certifying that certain Medicare patients qualified for partial hospitalization services when they did not and paying kickbacks to group home operators and patient recruiters in exchange for referring Medicare patients;
  • An owner of a DME company was sentenced to 84 months in prison for paying kickbacks to medical clinics for fraudulent prescriptions for DME which the patients did not need; and
  • 2 home health directors were sentenced to over 10 years in prison and ordered to pay $18.6 million in restitution after pleading guilty to conspiracy to commit fraud and payment of kickbacks in exchange for Medicare referrals and home health service prescriptions.

You Could Personally Be Fined Or Go To Jail

The government is clearly cracking down and the healthcare industry should heed the warning. The Report indicates that any individual in the healthcare realm, whether physician or hospital CFO, could incur steep fines, penalties and even serve jail time for violating the Federal Anti-Kickback Statute, Stark Law and False Claims Act.

Jeyaram & Associates can help you assess and minimize your risk under these healthcare fraud and abuse laws. If you have any questions please contact Danielle Hildebrand at Dhildebrand@jeylaw.com or 678.325.3872.

To review the Report it is available here.

Avoid Being A Target Of HIPAA Audits | Here’s How

HIPAA AuditPhase 2 OCR HIPAA Audits Are Here – What Providers Should Do to Prepare

The Office of Civil Rights (OCR) has taken the first step in the next round of HIPAA audits.

OCR has begun to send out surveys in order to collect information from providers, health plans, and clearinghouses in preparation for phase 2 of their HIPAA audits. From the hundreds of entities receiving surveys, OCR will select over 200 providers and over 100 health plans to be audited.

It is more important than ever to make sure that you have complied with the HIPAA Rules. Here are the top 3 areas every provider should address:

1. When was the last time you conducted a Risk Assessment? If it has been more than a year or two, you should conduct a comprehensive Risk Assessment now.

If you are a small to medium sized office you can take advantage of HHS’s security risk assessment tool available on their website: HHS.gov SRA Tool

2. Have you recently reviewed your HIPAA policies and procedures to ensure that they are up to date and are being followed? There are three main areas that need to be addressed in your policies: Security Standards, Privacy Standards and Breach Notification Standards.

    • Security Standards – focus on how you keep Protected Health Information (PHI) secure, whether it is stored and/transmitted electronically or in some other form. Your practice must have appropriate safeguards in place (for example, requiring the use of secure passwords to access electronic health records and encrypting all devices that might contain e-PHI).
    • Privacy Standards – do you conduct periodic trainings for personnel regarding privacy practices? Do you have records that such trainings have been completed by all personnel? Is your Notice of Privacy Practices current and made available to your patients?
    • Breach Notification Standards – do you have a policy in place that outlines the steps for identifying and reporting a breach? Such a policy should address steps to take to investigate and contain the problem, as well as a means for identifying how many people were affected, who those individuals are, and how to send out breach notices. Keep in mind that under the Breach Notification Rule, providers must provide notice of a breach within a certain time frame. Your procedures for responding to a breach should allow for adequate time to meet this deadline.

3. Keeping track of your Business Associates and Business Associate Agreements – During the audit process OCR might ask for a list of business associates and their contact information. All providers should have this readily available. It is also important to have written Business Associate Agreements that are up to date and can be made available to OCR upon request.

If you have any questions about any HIPAA requirements or the approaching OCR audits our attorneys can help. Please contact Danielle Hildebrand at dhildebrand@jeylaw.com.

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The information on this site should not be construed as formal legal advice and is not intended to create or constitute a lawyer-client relationship.

 

Physicians Need To Be Prepared For Increased Medicare & Medicaid Fraud Scrutiny

doctor-in-handcuffs-caption-1HHS increases resources to root out and penalize fraud:  Review existing financial arrangements NOW

On June 30th the federal Department of Health and Human Services Office of the Inspector General announced that it has created a specialized unit comprised of attorneys focused on Medicare and Medicaid fraud. This announcement comes on the heels of the OIG Special Fraud Alert reminding physicians of anti-kickback liability for illegal compensation related to arrangements with healthcare institutions.

Physicians should be prepared for increased scrutiny and an uptick in enforcement actions for kickback violations. According to OIG official Lisa Re, the new unit will be targeting kickback cases and will be going after not only the individual or organization paying the kickbacks but also the recipient of the kickbacks, e.g., the physicians.

Physicians who have financial arrangements that violate the Federal Anti-Kickback Statute would not only be subject to fines in the form of Civil Money Penalties, but could also be excluded from the Medicare and Medicaid programs.

Now is the time for physicians to review existing or proposed financial arrangements to ensure that they do not pose any risk of violating the Anti-Kickback Statute.

If you have any questions about a particular arrangement our attorneys can help. Please call Danielle Hildebrand or DJ Jeyaram at 678-325-3872 for legal counsel.

Increase In Medicare Part D Fraud Investigations

medicare-fraud1On June 18th, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services announced a nationwide sweep by the Medicare Fraud Strike Force in 17 districts. This sweep represents the largest criminal healthcare fraud takedown in the history of the Department of Justice.

The investigations led to charges against 243 individuals, including 46 doctors and 197 other medical personnel. These individual are charged with participating in Medicare fraud schemes, including prescription drug fraud, totaling approximately $712 million in false billings.

On the heels of this announcement, the Office of Inspector General issued two new reports citing its findings of numerous nationwide violations of Medicare part D, Medicare’s drug benefit program. The reports show that more than 1,400 pharmacies submitted questionable billings for opioid drugs and also point to questionable billing practices in 1,432 retail pharmacies. The OIG is calling for more action from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services to implement a greater number of its recommendations for fighting fraud and abuse in Part D.

The timing of these reports signals that the prescription drug benefit in Medicare part D will continue to be on the radar for investigation and enforcement actions.

To best protect against facing investigation for violations of federal and state healthcare regulations, providers must create, consistently practice and enforce strong internal compliance programs. If you need assistance with developing a compliance program or have any questions about healthcare fraud, please call or email Kimberly Sheridan at 678-708-4702.

 

OIG Reports

https://oig.hhs.gov/oei/reports/oei-02-15-00190.pdf

https://oig.hhs.gov/oei/reports/oei-03-15-00180.pdf