Georgia's Trusted Healthcare
& Medical Provider Attorneys

Are You Compliant? HHS Issues Guidance & Likely To Continue HIPAA Compliance Scrutiny

HIPAA AuditThe Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) started the year by publishing new HIPAA guidance with respect to patient access to medical records.

While the recent HHS guidance does not add anything new to the regulations, it serves as a reminder to providers of certain provisions in the law. The guidance is intended as a tool to aid individuals in exercising their rights to access their medical records and to help providers ensure HIPAA compliance.

HHS highlighted certain provisions in the HIPAA regulations including provider obligations to respond to a request from a patient within 30 days and provide PHI in an electronic format if requested (assuming the electronic format requested can be readily produced by the provider).

The guidance also reminds providers that covered entities are not required to provide every single record about an individual even if the individual asks. Certain exceptions to a patient’s right to access include:

  • Patients do not have the right to access to information that is not used to make decisions about that individual. For example, certain quality assessment or improvement records, patient safety activity records, or business planning, development and management records that are used for business decisions do not have to be provided to an individual.
  • Individuals do not have a right to access psychotherapy notes that a mental health professional maintains separately from the individual’s medical record and that document or analyze the contents of a counseling session with the individual.
  • Providers can deny access to certain records if a licensed health care professional determines in the exercise of professional judgment that the access requested is reasonably likely to endanger the life or physical safety of the individual or another person.
  • Patients do not have a right to access certain records compiled in reasonable anticipation of, or for use in, a legal proceeding.

Additionally, providers do not have to create new information, such as explanatory materials or analyses, that does not already exist in the record.

The government’s emphasis on HIPAA is expected to continue with pending audits of covered entities and business associates likely to take place this quarter. Now is the time for healthcare providers to review their policies to ensure that they are complying with the HIPAA regulations.

If you would like to review the HHS guidance it is available at

If you need help ensuring HIPAA compliance, please contact Danielle Hildebrand at or 678.325.3872.



Jonathan Anderson Joins Jeyaram & Associates

Jonathan AndersonPlease help us welcome Jonathan Anderson to our legal team!

Mr. Anderson is an associate attorney specializing in healthcare law. Prior to joining Jeyaram & Associates, Mr. Anderson worked as a legal intern on the Disability Integration Project for the Atlanta Legal Aid Society.

Mr. Anderson provided legal support to individuals with disabilities to help them remain in or move back the community rather than live in institutions. He also worked extensively with state Medicaid waivers including appealing the State’s decisions to terminate benefits of disabled individuals.

Mr. Anderson also served as an intern for the Health Law Partnership (HeLP) which serves clients whom meet certain income requirements and have a treatment relationship with Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta (CHOA). He conducted interviews, drafted briefs for Supplemental Security Insurance, and researched how changes in Supplemental Security Insurance regulations affected HeLP clients.

Legal Expertise

  • Medicaid Waivers
  • Medicare
  • Mediation

Jonathan can be reached at

Credit Cards and Special Needs Trusts: How They Can Work Together

Credit Card Care A special needs trust is designed to supplement the income of an individual with special needs so that she can maintain access to government benefits without necessarily sacrificing her standard of living.

But government benefits like Supplemental Security Income (SSI) and Medicaid prohibit the trustee of a special needs trust from simply giving a beneficiary cash to pay for goods and services herself. Instead, a trustee must pay vendors directly.

Credit cards offer a way for the trustee of a special needs trust to avoid giving a beneficiary cash while at the same time not serving as the beneficiary’s designated shopper.

Because a credit card is technically a loan from the credit card company to the cardholder, the goods or services purchased by a trust beneficiary using a card are not income and do not affect his access to government benefits. If the special needs trust then pays off the balance of a beneficiary’s credit card bill, the payment is likewise not considered income.

Because of this special treatment, an SSI or Medicaid beneficiary who is capable of managing her own affairs can use a credit card to make small purchases, and a trustee of a special needs trust need not micromanage every transaction.

Several very important rules apply to the use of credit cards, however.

  • First, a trustee cannot pay for any charges on the credit card that are for food or shelter.
  • Second, a trustee of a first-party special needs trust that was established with the beneficiary’s own money cannot pay for any credit card charges that a beneficiary may have incurred paying for goods or services that were used by other people because first-party trusts can only be used for the sole benefit of the person with special needs.
  • Third, a trustee should never give a credit card to a beneficiary who is incapable of managing her own financial affairs, or who is involved with people who will take advantage of her.
  • Finally, the credit card rules apply only to credit cards; debit cards are considered cash and should never be used.

Since the rules governing credit cards are complicated, it is imperative that you discuss the ongoing use of credit cards with a special needs planner prior to turning a card over to a beneficiary or paying a beneficiary’s bill.

Please contact DJ Jeyaram at or 678.325.3872 for assistance.


Jeyaram & Associate Medicaid Fraud Expert Interviewed On “Mostly Medicaid”

Medicaid FraudJeyaram & Associate attorney Kimberly Sheridan was interviewed about Medicaid fraud.

The segment originally aired today on the national site “Mostly Medicaid.”

To hear the interview, click here.


Two Things Every Special Needs Parent Should Know

Free workshop hosted by Jeyaram & Associates

Jeyaram & Associates is hosting a free workshop on how to win an appeal if you’ve been denied Katie Beckett and how to protect your special needs child’s benefits with a special needs trust.

DJ Jeyaram, Esq. is the leading Katie Beckett appeals expert in Georgia and the father of a special needs child. Mr. Jeyaram has intimate knowledge of the Katie Beckett appeals process and is a former administrative law judge.

After the presentation, Mr. Jeyaram will answer questions about appeal Katie Beckett denials and how to protect special need children’s benefits – now and in the future.

Special Needs Trust

  • Who: Special needs parents and caregivers
  • What: Free workshop presented by DJ Jeyaram, Esq.
  • When: October 22nd at 6:30 p.m.
  • Where: Kidspeech in Lawrenceville, GA

***Space is limited. Must RSVP to by 10/17***

Congratulations To Jeyaram & Associates For Being Featured In The Business News Daily

Reprinted with permission from the Business News Daily
Special Needs Trusts


Owner DJ Jeyaram Esq. shared the story behind Jeyaram & Associates, a family-focused law firm that specializes in special needs trusts, wills, estate planning and healthcare legal services.

My son Kai, pictured in this photo, was born with a rare genetic condition called Williams Syndrome. He brings us an amazing amount of joy despite all of his challenges.

Soon after my son was born, we realized that we needed a plan to protect him in case anything happened to me or my wife, so we began offering special needs trusts, which help protect children’s current and future government benefits.

I started my business in 2007 after working at a large law firm. I realized that most special needs families could not afford my big firm rates and I was forced to refer these families to small firm attorneys that did not necessarily have the proper training to set up a special needs estate plan. Three months later, I hung out my shingle and have successfully been in business for more than 8 years. It’s been one of the best decisions I ever made.

One of the biggest challenges we face is limiting the number of pro bono cases we take every year. Because we have a special needs child and are ingrained in the special needs community, we meet a lot of families that need legal help but don’t have the necessary resources. We want to help everyone because we always think ‘That could be us.’

RSVP For Free Legal Workshop: Katie Beckett/Deeming Waiver Appeal & Special Needs Trusts

IEP Education LawTwo Things Every Special Needs Parent Should Know

1. How to Win A Katie Beckett Appeal: A presentation on how to appeal a Katie Beckett denial. Almost all applications are initially denied. Learn how to prepare and what to expect – and when to engage a lawyer.

2. Protecting Benefits With Special Needs Trusts: Learn the basics on what a special needs trust is and how it works. We’ll also talk about the ABLE Act and how it works with a special needs trust.

  • When Friday, September 11 at 10:00 am to 11:30 am
  • Where: FOCUS main office | 3825 Presidential Parkway, Suite 103 – Atlanta, Georgia 30340
  • Who : DJ Jeyaram, Esq. – attorney and special needs parent

Please RSVP to with your name and the word “Trust” in the subject line by September 1st.


FOCUS offers comfort, hope, and fun to families with children who are medically fragile or have significant developmental or physical disabilities through a variety of programs.




Without A Will, A Court Could Decide Custody Of Your Child

wills, Trusts and Estates10 Tips On Choosing The Right Guardian

Sadly, during the past couple of weeks, we learned of the passing of several friends and acquaintances. All of their passings were sudden. A heart attack. A car accident. A sudden mystery illness. An aneurism. To be honest, we became a bit leery about answering our phones.

Death isn’t something we like to think about, let alone talk about. However, these past few weeks were a stark reminder of how important it is to make sure we prepare for the future and to make sure our families are protected – especially if you have minor children.

We often assume that a member of our family – maybe a sister or our own mother – will automatically be given custody of our children if something happens to us. However, this is not true unless you have a will, trust or estate plan in place that specifically names them as guardians. Without a legal plan in place, anyone can request custody and a judge will decide with whom your child/children will live with.

As a result, it’s imperative to establish a will and choose a guardian for your child.

Following are some things to consider when choosing the right guardian:

  1. Age – How old is the person you’re considering to assume custody of your child if you pass? You want to make sure the potential guardian will be around for a while to raise your child.
  1. Ability – How is the health of the potential guardian? Does he/she need a lot of medical care? Is he/she emotionally stable? How many other children does the potential guardian already care for? Does he/she have a demanding job or a job that requires him/her to frequently travel? You wan to select someone who is going to be physically present and give your child the attention he/she needs – especially since your child will already be dealing with loss and grieving.
  1. Already established relationship with your child – Does the potential guardian already know your child and have an established relationship with him/her? Imagine being forced to live with someone you don’t know. Add on the stress of losing a parent. It’s imperative that your child know and be comfortable with the potential guardian.
  1. Location – Where does the potential guardian live? Is this somewhere you’d want your child to live? If you currently live in the city and your potential guardian lives in a small, remote town – would your child be happy and thrive? Does the potential guardian live in a good school district or are there good private schools nearby?
  1. Family values – Finding a potential guardian with the same family values can be challenging – but it’s perhaps one of the most important criteria to consider. Is this individual willing to instill and be supportive of your family values – especially if they do not mirror yours?
  1. Parenting style – Does the potential guardian believe in time outs? Is education important? Is the potential guardian strict or nurturing? You’ll want to choose someone who reflects your parenting style to minimize the stress and confusion on your child.
  1. Stable and loving – Selecting a guardian who can provide a stable environment for your child is critical – especially as your child will be grieving. Your child will look to the guardian for emotional and physical stability. Is the guardian in a stable relationship? Is his/her spouse open to being a guardian as well?
  1. Willing and want to serve as guardian – Taking on custody is a big responsibility. While some family members may love your child – assuming custody and providing for his/her every need is a different story. It’s important to have open and honest conversations about potential guardians to see if they want to serve as a potential guardian. Now is NOT the time to try and avoid hurt feelings. Your child’s well being and future is what’s most important.
  1. Character – Does your potential guardian have a court record of drug or alcohol abuse or a criminal history? If so, a court will reject and override your selected guardian. You want to select someone who will serve as a good role model for your child.
  1. Back up – Life happens. Your designated guardian may become incapacitated or have a change of heart upon your passing. It’s critical to have a back up potential guardian to ensure your child has a safe, loving and stable home.

It’s important to remember that a guardian is NOT required to financially support your child. As a result, it’s important when you’re setting up your will, trust or estate, to legally earmark funds for your child in a trust. Then, you will need to select an individual to oversee the disbursement of the money in the trust. This person is called a trustee. Often times, the trustee is different from your child’s guardian.

Selecting a guardian for your child can be a difficult decision – but it’s an important one. By legally documenting your wishes for your child/children, you help ensure that your loved ones are cared for and that a custody battle does not publicly play out in court.

Once you’ve carefully thought about and chosen a guardian for your child, we encourage you to consult with an attorney to help document your decision so that it becomes legally binding.

If you have questions or would like assistance, please contact DJ Jeyaram at or 678.325.3872

ICD-10 Deadline Less Than 3 Months Away – Need Help?

CMS Announces Measures To Help Ease Transition

The countdown to the ICD-10 has begun in earnest, and the Centers for Medicaid & Medicare Services (CMS) has made it clear that it will not back down on the deadline of October 1, 2015. However, CMS announced on July 6, that it is adopting policies to help ease the transition to ICD-10.

The ICD-9 code sets used to report medical diagnoses and inpatient procedures will be replaced by ICD-10 code. ICD-10 will affect diagnosis and inpatient procedure coding for everyone covered by the Health Insurance Portability Accountability Act (HIPAA), not just those who submit Medicare or Medicaid claims.

Although the American Medical Association (AMA)  has long opposed the ICD-10 conversion, it issued a joint press release with CMS on July 6. The press release addresses some of the AMA’s concerns and offers some concessions by CMS. To assuage concerns from healthcare providers about inadvertent coding errors that could lead to audits and penalties, CMS has named a CMS ICD-10 Ombudsman to triage and answer questions about the submission of claims. The ICD-10 Ombudsman will be located at CMS’s ICD-10 Coordination Center. CMS has also released provider training videos and an outline of its implementation plan.

Additionally, CMS has announced that for one year past the Oct. 1, 2015, deadline, it will reimburse for incorrectly coded claims as long as that erroneous code is in the same broad family as the right one.

Providers should note that claims for services provided on or after the compliance date will need to be submitted with ICD-10 diagnosis codes; but claims for services provided prior to the compliance date should be submitted with ICD-9 diagnosis codes.

It is important for providers to have their practices ready to implement ICD-10 on October 1, 2015. If you need help with the ICD-10 transition and implementation, call Jeyaram & Associates’ Kimberly Sheridan at 678-708-4703.

Physicians Need To Be Prepared For Increased Medicare & Medicaid Fraud Scrutiny

doctor-in-handcuffs-caption-1HHS increases resources to root out and penalize fraud:  Review existing financial arrangements NOW

On June 30th the federal Department of Health and Human Services Office of the Inspector General announced that it has created a specialized unit comprised of attorneys focused on Medicare and Medicaid fraud. This announcement comes on the heels of the OIG Special Fraud Alert reminding physicians of anti-kickback liability for illegal compensation related to arrangements with healthcare institutions.

Physicians should be prepared for increased scrutiny and an uptick in enforcement actions for kickback violations. According to OIG official Lisa Re, the new unit will be targeting kickback cases and will be going after not only the individual or organization paying the kickbacks but also the recipient of the kickbacks, e.g., the physicians.

Physicians who have financial arrangements that violate the Federal Anti-Kickback Statute would not only be subject to fines in the form of Civil Money Penalties, but could also be excluded from the Medicare and Medicaid programs.

Now is the time for physicians to review existing or proposed financial arrangements to ensure that they do not pose any risk of violating the Anti-Kickback Statute.

If you have any questions about a particular arrangement our attorneys can help. Please call Danielle Hildebrand or DJ Jeyaram at 678-325-3872 for legal counsel.