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Archives for April 2015

Court Finds DCH’s Handling of Mass Reprocessing “Inconsistent and Misleading”

DCHIn a decision last week, the Office of State Administrative Hearings (OSAH) reversed the Department of Community Health’s (DCH) denial of a Request for Administrative Review by a group of Children Intervention Services (“CIS”) providers. The CIS providers had requested a review of recoupment actions that stemmed from two 2014 Mass Reprocessings by the Department, one involving NCCI edits that included claims dating back to 2010.  The Department argued that the providers missed the 30 day deadline to file a Request for Administrative Review.

Attorney Kimberly Sheridan of Jeyaram & Associates represented the group of CIS providers in the administrative hearing and argued that the providers should be granted a review because they followed all the instructions specific to the mass reprocessing posted by the Department in several banner messages and emails, as well as in-person conversations. Through the banner and email message instructions, the Department departed from its standard deadlines in its policy manuals.  The Court found that the Department’s position was “illogical and wholly unfair,” and that its instructions to the providers after the mass reprocessing were “inconsistent and misleading.” The Court also said the providers had justifiably relied on these instructions and could not now be penalized for their reliance.

At this time, the Department has not made it known if it will appeal the decision.

If you are a provider subject to a recoupment and need help, or if you need to appeal DCH’s decisions, Jeyaram & Associates has extensive experience and success with these cases. Contact Kimberly Sheridan at ksheridan@Jeylaw.com or 678.325.3872.

Healthcare Providers Need To Examine Billing Practices To Ensure Compliance

healthcare fraudLast month, the Department of Health and Human Services released its annual report for the Health Care Fraud and Abuse Control Program. According to the report, in 2014 more than 900 new criminal health care fraud investigations were opened by the Department of Justice. There was a slight increase in the number of criminal cases and convictions from last year, with 496 cases and 735 defendants convicted of criminal health care fraud. Civil cases alone resulted in $2.3 Billion in settlements and judgments.

The government’s press release reiterated that detecting and eliminating fraud and abuse continues to be a top priority. The government attributes its high recoveries to a change in strategy which uses real-time data analysis to detect fraud more quickly. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid currently uses advanced analytics on Medicare fee-for-service claims. The goal of this is to detect aberrant and suspicious billing patterns which would then trigger an investigation or enforcement action by the government.

Now is the time to for Medicare and Medicaid providers to review their billing practices and financial relationships to ensure that they are compliant with federal laws. Charges against providers were made under the False Claims Act, as well as Anti-Kickback Statute, the Stark Law (Physician Self-Referral Law), and other federal laws.

The full annual report is available at www.oig.hhs.gov/publications/hcfac.asp.

If you have any questions about the legality of your billing practices or financial relationships, please contact DJ Jeyaram at DJ@jeylaw.com or Danielle Hildebrand at dhildebrand@jeylaw.com.